Health and Hygiene

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Health and Hygiene

1 / 230

You must report to your regulatory authority when a food handler is diagnosed with what kind of illness?

2 / 230

These are some common symptoms of illness caused by the Big Six Pathogen Hepatitis A:

• Nausea
• Jaundice
• Vomiting
• Diarrhea
• Fever (mild)
• Poor appetite
• Tea coloured urine
• Abdominal discomfort
• Fatigue or general weakness

What is the onset time for Hepatitis A?

3 / 230

What handwashing problem do most food handlers have?

4 / 230

What do food handlers need to do after these activities?

• Handling money
• Handling animals
• Completing a task
• Using the bathroom
• Taking out the trash
• Handling hazardous chemicals
• Touching their clothes or body
• Using a handkerchief or tissue
• Handling anything dirty
• Using a phone or personal device
• Handling raw meat, seafood, or poultry
• Leaving and returning to their work area
• Coughing, sneezing, or blowing their nose
• Touching dirty equipment or surfaces
• Eating, drinking, smoking, or chewing gum or tobacco

5 / 230

When does a garbage container need to be available at a handwashing station?

6 / 230

What does dirty clothing carry that can cause foodborne illness?

7 / 230

What should you do if a food handler is vomiting, has diarrhea, or has been diagnosed with an illness caused by a Big Six Pathogen?

8 / 230

How can you use a disposable paper towel to avoid contaminating your hands after washing them?

9 / 230

Why must infected cuts and burns be covered if they are open or draining?

10 / 230

How can your operation meet the FDA’s recommendation to “control hands as a vehicle of contamination?”

11 / 230

Which are symptoms of rotavirus gastroenteritis?

12 / 230

Where should food handlers wash their hands?

13 / 230

Bare hand contact with ready-to-eat food may be allowed if the food will be added to a dish and cooked. What conditions make this acceptable?

14 / 230

What is the most essential part of personal hygiene?

15 / 230

Which statement is true about single-use gloves?

16 / 230

Why should staff wear clean clothing daily and change dirty uniforms and aprons?

17 / 230

What must you do if a food handler has any of these symptoms?

• Vomiting
• Diarrhea
• Jaundice
• Sore throat with fever
• Infected cut or burn

18 / 230

If a food handler gets sick, when should they report it to you?

19 / 230

Which is a classification of contaminants?

20 / 230

Hand sanitizers should be allowed to air dry before doing what?

21 / 230

What kinds of foods are parasites commonly associated with?

22 / 230

What liquids and gels reduce the pathogens on hands and skin?

23 / 230

Which is an example of how a “carrier” can appear healthy but spread illness to others without knowing?

24 / 230

What happens if a food handler’s fingernail chips or breaks off into food?

25 / 230

Which is true about Hepatitis A?

26 / 230

When is it acceptable to change your gloves without hand washing?

27 / 230

What should have these features?

• Food safe
• Disposable
• Various sizes

28 / 230

Why do people with these medical conditions have a higher risk for foodborne illness?

• Cancer or chemotherapy patients
• People infected with HIV or have AIDS
• People who have had an organ transplant

29 / 230

Store dirty clothing like aprons, chef coats, or uniforms away from food and prep areas. What kind of container should they be stored in until they are washed?

30 / 230

What example does ServSafe give for “controlling hands as a vehicle of contamination”?

31 / 230

Which guideline can prevent cross-contamination during storage?

32 / 230

Why should you be aware of these conditions in your staff?

• Fever
• Vomiting
• Diarrhea
• Sneezing
• Runny nose
• Chills/cold sweats
• Frequent bathroom use
• Yellowing of the skin or eyes

33 / 230

Which is an advantage with bimetallic-stemmed thermometers?

34 / 230

Who should determine when the employees can safely return to the operation and/or carry out their regular food-handling duties?

35 / 230

When a food handler is excluded from the operation for having jaundice, when can they return to work?

36 / 230

Which kind of jewelry must be removed from the hands and arms when prepping food or when working near food prep areas?

37 / 230

When is it acceptable for a food handler to use hand sanitizers or antiseptics instead of washing their hands?

38 / 230

What do food handlers with facial hair need to wear?

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What should be done before using hand sanitizers or antiseptics?

40 / 230

41 / 230

Staff may drink from a correctly covered container. How is a container covered correctly?

42 / 230

What is it called when you prohibit an employee from entering the operation for medical reasons?

43 / 230

The onset-time is how long it takes for the symptoms of an illness to begin. Many people start experiencing these symptoms within minutes of consuming seafood toxins:

• Vomiting
• Diarrhea
• Flushing of the face
• Difficulty breathing
• Burning in the mouth
• Heart palpitations
• Hives
• Neurological symptoms

What neurological symptoms may occur after eating fish contaminated with seafood toxins?

44 / 230

Where can the parasite cryptosporidium parvum be found?

45 / 230

What should you do if a food handler has jaundice for a week or less?

46 / 230

People with compromised immune systems have a greater risk of foodborne illness. Which statement is true about the word ‘compromised’?

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Why do food handlers with nail polish need to wear single-use gloves?

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What should food handlers do before putting on single-use gloves?

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When do staff need to report illnesses to you?

50 / 230

These actions by a manager will ensure a successful personal hygiene program:

• Make personal hygiene policies
• Train staff to follow your policies and retrain them regularly
• Be a good role model by consistently demonstrating the correct behavior
• Always supervise any activities that can affect food safety
• Keep your personal hygiene policies current with science and the law

What role do you play as the manager in your operations personal hygiene program?

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How should a cut or burn be covered if it’s on the hand or wrist?

52 / 230

What should you do if a food handler has any of these issues?

• Vomiting or diarrhea
• Diagnosed with Hepatitis A
• Becomes jaundiced within a week
• Diagnosed with Salmonella Typhi
• Sore throat with fever, and serve a high-risk population

53 / 230

Which statement is true about the symptoms caused by consuming chemicals?

54 / 230

What is required in handwashing stations?

55 / 230

Which is true about aprons?

56 / 230

What does dirty clothing need to be separated from when stored in the operation?

57 / 230

What should a food handler do with their apron during these activities?

• Using the restroom
• Taking out the trash
• Leaving food prep areas

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What should you do when a food handler has a sore throat with a fever?

59 / 230

Why are food handlers NOT allowed to wear nail polish in some jurisdictions?

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How can food become contaminated by bare-hand contact?

61 / 230

Which decision is based on where the infected cut or burn is located on a food handler?

62 / 230

For which of these reasons should food handlers file their fingernails to keep them smooth?

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Where does Salmonella Typhi come from?

64 / 230

Why are food handlers NOT allowed to wear jewelry when prepping food or in food prep areas?

65 / 230

A food handler with an illness caused by what pathogen requires that you exclude them from the operation?

66 / 230

What should you do when a food handler has a sore throat with a fever?

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What is a person called who carries pathogens and infects others but never gets sick themselves?

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What should be avoided so handwashing stations remain available for staff?

69 / 230

What program does your operation need to keep food handlers from contaminating food?

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How can food handlers be prevented from contaminating food by wearing dirty clothes that carry pathogens?

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Which is a prevention measure for viruses?

72 / 230

Dirty laundry should be stored in washable laundry bags or nonabsorbent containers. To avoid contamination, what areas should it be kept away from?

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What should be done with food and food-contact surfaces that may have been contaminated by unwashed hands?

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How can food handlers prevent cross-contamination and time-temperature abuse when preparing food?

75 / 230

Why do food handlers wearing false fingernails need to also wear gloves?

76 / 230

Why should these actions be avoided?

• Scratching the scalp
• Running fingers through the hair
• Wiping or touching the nose
• Rubbing an ear
• Touching a pimple or an infected wound/boil
• Wearing and touching a dirty uniform
• Coughing or sneezing into the hand
• Spitting in the operation

77 / 230

How is Shigella spp transferred?

78 / 230

These are the steps to proper handwashing:

1. Wet: Use warm water
2. Soap: Use lots
3. Scrub: Hands, fingers, and arms for 10-15 seconds
4. Rinse: Thoroughly with warm water
5. Dry: Use paper towels or a hand dryer

How long does the whole process take?

79 / 230

Which is true about restricting a food handler?

80 / 230

What are the best ways to prevent the spread of viruses in your operation?

81 / 230

What is NOT a replacement for handwashing?

82 / 230

Where should street clothing and personal belongings like backpacks, jackets, electronic devices, keys, and personal medications be stored?

83 / 230

If the food handler has a sore throat with a fever?

84 / 230

Every thermometer should be calibrated at the beginning of each shift, when is another time to calibrate them?

85 / 230

Where should staff store personal belongings, like their street clothes, coats, backpacks, keys, and phones?

86 / 230

What do hand sanitizers and antiseptics do?

87 / 230

What is it called when you prohibit an employee from working with exposed food, utensils, and equipment for a medical reason?

88 / 230

You can achieve Active Managerial Control (AMC) in your operation with a HACCP program, but HACCP is complicated. According to the FDA, what are the three simple programs that can also achieve AMC?

89 / 230

What must a food handler do if diagnosed with an illness caused by one of these pathogens?

• Norovirus
• Hepatitis A
• Shigella spp.
• Salmonella Typhi
• Nontyphoidal Salmonella
• Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC)

90 / 230

What standards must hand sanitizers and antiseptics comply with when used in a food service operation?

91 / 230

When a wound or boil is located on the body (NOT hands or arms), what kind of bandage should it be covered with?

92 / 230

Depending on the illness and symptoms, what should you do if a food handler is sick?

93 / 230

Which method is an acceptable substitute for washing hands?

94 / 230

What should you do if a food handler has been diagnosed with Hepatitis A or Salmonella Typhi but has no symptoms?

95 / 230

Some jurisdictions allow bare-hand contact with ready to eat food. What do regulatory authorities require if they allow this?

96 / 230

Which is an example of Reduced Oxygen Packaging (ROP)?

97 / 230

How should food handlers keep their fingernails?

98 / 230

How can you ensure that food handlers are washing their hands correctly?

99 / 230

When equipment or an area is designated, it is used for a specific purpose. What equipment or area should have a defined purpose in your operation?

100 / 230

How can parasites be prevented from causing foodborne illness?

101 / 230

Which is true about the differences between a cross-connection, cross-contamination, and cross-contact?

102 / 230

To avoid cross-contact, when should you wash your hands and change gloves?

103 / 230

If ready-to-eat (RTE) food will be added as an ingredient to a dish, when is it acceptable to handle it with bare hands?

104 / 230

What could happen when a food handler in your operation has any of these issues?

• They’re sneezing or coughing
• They have a foodborne illness
• They have an infected cut or burn
• They have been in contact with a sick person
• They don’t wash their hands after using the bathroom
• They have symptoms like diarrhea, vomiting, or jaundice

105 / 230

Why do older adults have a higher risk for foodborne illness?

106 / 230

If an employee has an illness, when do they need to report it you?

107 / 230

What must food handlers do before preparing food or using equipment and utensils?

108 / 230

Cross-contamination can occur when water from a handwashing sink splashes onto food or food-contact surfaces. How can this be prevented?

109 / 230

What is the only kind of hair accessory that staff should wear?

110 / 230

When do food handlers need to wash their hands if they work with raw meat, poultry, or seafood?

111 / 230

What must you do if a food handler is diagnosed with an illness caused by one of these pathogens?

• Norovirus
• Hepatitis A
• Shigella spp.
• Salmonella Typhi
• Nontyphoidal Salmonella
• Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC)

112 / 230

What should you check your gloves for after putting them on?

113 / 230

Besides washing hands, what else can handwashing stations be used for?

114 / 230

What should staff do if they get sick while working?

115 / 230

Why do food handlers with false fingernails need to wear single-use gloves?

116 / 230

What do our hands touch every day that we cannot see?

117 / 230

How can you use a paper towel to avoid re-contaminating your hands after you finish washing them?

118 / 230

Why are staff NOT allowed to wear false eyelashes?

119 / 230

What does proper handwashing and hand care prevent?

120 / 230

Ice is considered a ready-to-eat food, so bare-hand contact must be avoided. What should be used to transfer or carry ice?

121 / 230

What is the most essential part of personal hygiene?

122 / 230

What can a food handler wear if they also wear single-use gloves?

123 / 230

Food handlers are NOT allowed to wear jewelry when working with or around food. Are servers allowed to wear jewelry?

124 / 230

Can healthy people spread pathogens?

125 / 230

When a food handler has been restricted or excluded due to illness caused by a Big Six Pathogen, who will determine when they can safely return to the operation or work with food?

126 / 230

How should a cut or burn be covered if it’s on the arm?

127 / 230

Why is a smooth, plain band the only ring that can be worn when working with or near food?

128 / 230

Why should handwashing stations be in convenient locations?

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Why is it important to avoid bare-hand contact with the food-contact surfaces of flatware and utensils?

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How can a food handler who appears to be healthy spread foodborne pathogens?

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Ciguatera Toxin is a seafood toxin linked to barracuda, snapper, grouper, and amberjack fish. Which of these statement are true about Ciguatera Toxin?

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What should be done with single-use gloves after a task?

133 / 230

If you serve a high-risk population and exclude a food handler for having a sore throat with a fever, when can they return to work?

134 / 230

What should dishwashers have the ability to measure?

135 / 230

Food handlers should NOT wear hair accessories because they can get into food and become physical contaminants. What’s the only kind of hair accessory that should be worn?

136 / 230

Handwashing stations need to provide a way to dry hands. Besides disposable paper towels, what else can be provided?

137 / 230

What are some examples of accidental contamination?

138 / 230

When can a food handler who has been excluded for vomiting or diarrhea return to work?

139 / 230

When a food handler has been diagnosed with an illness caused by a Big Six Pathogen, who should you consult to determine if they should be excluded from the operation or restricted from working with exposed food, utensils, and equipment?

140 / 230

Which group is at risk for foodborne illness because their immune system has weakened with age?

141 / 230

Food handlers should remove their aprons any time they leave the prep area. When do aprons need to be removed and stored?

142 / 230

Jaundice is a yellowing of the skin, eyes, or fingernails and is a symptom of the foodborne illness Hepatitis A. If a food handler suddenly (within a week) appears jaundiced, exclude them from the operation. What other symptoms require you to exclude a food handler?

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What should you do if a food handler has a sore throat with a fever?

144 / 230

What type of jewelry may NOT be allowed, depending on your company’s policy?

145 / 230

When can food handlers wear false fingernails?

146 / 230

What standards do hand sanitizers and antiseptics need to comply with?

147 / 230

How long should the whole handwashing process take?

148 / 230

Make frequent handwashing easy for staff by putting hand washing stations in convenient locations. Where are handwashing stations required?

149 / 230

What is the onset time of foodborne illness?

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How can handwashing stations be maintained?

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Why should food handlers keep their fingernails clean?

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Staff should only wear hair accessories if it will help them avoid touching their hair or prevent it from falling into food. Why shouldn’t you allow other kinds of hair accessories?

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Staff must report to you if they’re sickened by a Big Six Pathogen. And you must report it to your regulatory authority.

• Norovirus
• Hepatitis A
• Shigella spp.
• Salmonella Typhi
• Nontyphoidal Salmonella
• Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC)

Which Big Six Pathogens also require that your staff report to you if someone they live with has been sickened?

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Dirty clothing may carry pathogens that can cause foodborne illnesses. How can a food handler wearing dirty clothes contaminate food?

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A food handler diagnosed with most of the big six pathogens does NOT need to be excluded unless they are vomiting or have diarrhea. Which Big Six Pathogen diagnosis requires excluding, even without symptoms?

156 / 230

Why should food handlers wearing nail polish also wear disposable gloves?

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How many seconds should be spent vigorously scrubbing hands and arms during handwashing?

158 / 230

How should an infected cut or burn be covered if it’s on the arm?

159 / 230

What should you do if a food handler has been diagnosed with an illness caused by one of these pathogens?

• Hepatitis A
• Salmonella Typhi

160 / 230

What kind of materials should be used for the flooring, walls, and ceilings in your operation to make them easier to keep clean?

161 / 230

What situation is it acceptable to handle ready-to-eat food with bare hands?

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What should you if a food handler appeared normal but then became jaundiced (yellowing of their skin and eyes) within the last seven days?

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Which is an example of adulterating and misrepresenting food?

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What items should food handlers NOT wear when prepping food or in food prep areas?

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What food handling activity does NOT require food handlers to wear single-use gloves?

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Why should food handlers keep their fingernails trimmed and filed?

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What should you do if a food handler has a sore throat with a fever?

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What should you do if you see a food handler who is NOT following proper handwashing procedures?

169 / 230

What civil rights protections are provided for employees with non-transmittable diseases by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)?

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What do food handlers need to do at these times?

• Every four hours
• After a break from a task
• Before handling ready-to-eat food
• When they tear or get dirty
• Before you start doing something else
• After handling raw meat, seafood, or poultry

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How can food handlers avoid bare-hand contact with Ready-to-Eat (RTE) food?

172 / 230

Norovirus is responsible for 58% of all reported foodborne illness cases and is the most contagious foodborne pathogen. How is Norovirus transmitted from person to person?

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What should you do when a food handler has a cut or burn that has become infected?

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Norovirus and Hepatitis A are the only two viruses on the FDA’s list of Big Six Pathogens. How can Norovirus be transmitted differently than Hepatitis A?

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Where is the best place for staff to change into their work clothes when possible?

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Handwashing stations must have hot and cold running water. What is another requirement for the water?

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How can food handlers keep their hair from falling into food and onto food-contact surfaces?

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Some jurisdictions allow employees to drink from a covered container in food prep areas as long as they avoid contaminating surfaces. How should the container be covered?

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After applying hand sanitizer, let it dry before doing what?

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When a food handler has been restricted or excluded due to illness caused by a Big Six Pathogen, why should you consult with your regulatory authority and the medical practitioner to determine when they can return to the operation or work with food?

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What may be necessary when food handlers are NOT following proper handwashing procedures?

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What should the three points of focus be when developing a food defense program?

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What are the steps for washing a prosthetic device?

184 / 230

Where should handwashing stations be located?

185 / 230

What symptom in a food handler requires you to exclude them from the operation when diagnosed with an illness caused by one of these pathogens?

• Norovirus
• Shigella spp.
• Nontyphoidal Salmonella
• Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC)

186 / 230

If you primarily serve a high-risk population, when is it acceptable to handle ready-to-eat food with bare hands?

187 / 230

Which statement about foodborne illness symptoms is true?

188 / 230

When dirty clothing (aprons, chef coats, uniforms) is stored in the operation, how can it be kept away from food and prep areas?

189 / 230

How can you reduce the risk of contaminating gloves by touching them when putting them on?

190 / 230

How should food handlers avoid bare-hand contact with ready-to-eat food?

191 / 230

What can saliva contain that causes foodborne illnesses?

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To prevent the contamination of food, why is personal cleanliness essential for food handlers?

193 / 230

Here are some ways that a food handler can make people sick:

• NOT washing hands after using the bathroom
• Coughing or sneezing near food
• Touching a cut or burn and then touching food
• Working while sick

What risk factor is demonstrated by these examples?

194 / 230

Why is it important to wear the correct glove size?

195 / 230

When is it acceptable to wipe your hands on your apron?

196 / 230

What kind of people are more likely to get a foodborne illness because their immune system is underdeveloped?

197 / 230

What should you do if a food handler has any of these issues?

• A sore throat with a fever
• Constant sneezing, coughing, or runny nose
• An infected cut or burn that is NOT covered

198 / 230

A dress code should be set up in your operation to prevent pathogens from being transferred from clothing to food. How can you make sure the dress code works?

199 / 230

A sign or poster reminding staff to wash their hands before returning to work must be posted at handwashing stations. What does ServSafe call this?

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What should you do if a food handler is vomiting or has diarrhea from an infectious condition?

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Staff should NOT eat, drink, smoke, or chew gum or tobacco while prepping or serving food. What areas of the operation should these activities be banned?

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These people have a higher risk of getting a foodborne illness:

• People aged 65 and older
• Children aged five and under
• People with a weakened immune system

What term does ServSafe use to categorize these people?

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How do single-use gloves prevent food contamination?

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What should you do if a food handler is constantly coughing, sneezing, or has a runny nose?

205 / 230

What should never be done in dishwashing sinks or sinks used to discard wastewater?

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What are the Big Six Pathogens?

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When should food handlers remove these types of jewelry?

• Watches
• Earrings
• Necklaces
• Facial jewelry
• Rings (except for a plain band)
• Bracelets (including medical bracelets)

208 / 230

What are food additives used for?

209 / 230

What is your body’s natural defense against illness called?

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Besides single-use gloves, what else should be worn when handling food or working in prep areas?

211 / 230

Which of these should you focus on for an effective cleaning program?

212 / 230

What requirement must be met before a food handler excluded for vomiting or diarrhea can return to work?

213 / 230

Staff must be instructed to report to you or another manager when they are sick. Which staff need to know this?

214 / 230

How can a paper towel be used to avoid contaminating your hands after washing them in the restroom?

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Staff drinking from beverage containers must be careful to avoid contaminating:

• Their hands
• The beverage container
• Food, utensils, and equipment

What does the lid for the beverage container need to include?

216 / 230

Why must staff remove jewelry from their hands and arms before prepping food or when working in food prep areas?

217 / 230

When food is NOT served immediately after cooking and is temporarily stored at a safe temperature, it’s called ‘hot-holding’. Which are requirements for hot-holding food?

218 / 230

When is it acceptable to use a liquid hand sanitizer or antiseptic?

219 / 230

Which is a part of the fecal-oral route of contamination?

220 / 230

Why should you cooperate with medical staff and your regulatory authority when deciding to exclude or restrict a food handler?

221 / 230

What is the onset time for an illness caused by consuming chemicals?

222 / 230

What are some threats to the safety of food in your operation?

223 / 230

What should you do if a food handler is vomiting or has diarrhea and has been diagnosed with an illness caused by a Big Six Pathogen?

224 / 230

Why should you consider providing gloves that are NOT made from latex?

225 / 230

Which virus is included in the FDA’s list of Big Six Pathogens?

226 / 230

How can you ensure food handlers wash their hands in the correct sink?

227 / 230

Why should food handlers keep their fingernails short?

228 / 230

What can keep food safe by creating a barrier between hands and food?

229 / 230

Dirty clothing can carry pathogens that cause foodborne illnesses. How can these pathogens be transferred to food?

230 / 230

What can be transferred to someone’s hands while eating, drinking, smoking, or chewing gum and tobacco?