Cooking Food

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Cooking Food

1 / 30

How does the food’s size affect how quickly it will cool?

2 / 30

What type of container allows food to cool faster?

3 / 30

Hot TCS food that will be put in cold storage must be cooled to 41°F or lower within six hours. How does the two-stage cooling method achieve this?

4 / 30

How can the density of food affect how long it takes to cool?

5 / 30

What should be done as soon as possible once food has been cooked?

6 / 30

Sometimes, ice can be added as an ingredient to cool hot food quickly. What kind of ice should NOT be used for this purpose?

7 / 30

Food can be cooled quickly in a clean, sanitized prep sink filled with ice water. In addition to separating it into smaller containers, how can you make the food cool faster and more evenly?

8 / 30

Newly cooked TCS food must be cooled from 135°F to 41°F or lower within six hours. The safest way to do this is in two stages. How long should the stages last?

9 / 30

What factors affect how quickly food cools?

10 / 30

Which of these statements are true about blast chillers?

11 / 30

Which statements are true about blast chillers?

12 / 30

Why should coolers and refrigerators only be used to cool large amounts of hot food if they were built for that purpose?

13 / 30

What equipment can quickly cool a large amount of food by blasting it with cold air?

14 / 30

When cooling food with the two-stage method, how can food that is NOT yet cold be stored for further cooling?

15 / 30

If hot TCS food is placed in cold storage while still hot, it could remain in the Temperature Danger Zone (TDZ) (41°F to 135°F) for too long. How should hot TCS food be cooled in two stages before it’s placed in cold storage?

16 / 30

What type of container should be used to cool food quickly?

17 / 30

Why should a large amount of hot food never be cooled in a cooler?

18 / 30

After cooking, how long do you have to cool TCS food from 135°F to 41°F or lower?

19 / 30

How does the storage container affect how quickly food will cool?

20 / 30

When cooling food in two stages, what should be done if the temperature requirements for the first stage are NOT met within two hours?

21 / 30

How does the thickness or density of the food affect how quickly it will cool?

22 / 30

What are some factors that affect the amount of time that it takes to cool food?

23 / 30

Why must TCS food be cooled to 41°F or lower within six hours of cooking?

24 / 30

Pathogens grow between 41°F and 135°F. But they grow fastest between 70°F and 125°F. When cooling food in two stages, which stage has the most potential for pathogen growth?

25 / 30

When cooling food in two stages, what should be done next if the temperature requirements for the first stage are met before the two-hour time limit is up?

26 / 30

When food is NOT hot-held or served immediately after cooking, it must be removed from the Temperature Danger Zone (TDZ) as quickly as possible. How can this be done?

27 / 30

To cool a large amount of food with an ice-water bath, what kind of containers can the hot food be transferred into that will spread out the food and cool it faster?

28 / 30

Small containers of food in an ice-water bath cool faster and more evenly when stirred. What can be used to stir the food to cool it even more quickly?

29 / 30

How can you reduce the size of a large amount of food so that it will cool faster?

30 / 30

How can a large pot of soup or stew be cooled quickly before storage?