Module 02

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Created on By Brian Klein

Module 02

Module 02

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Which can be symptoms of listeriosis?

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The onset time for symptoms of Hepatitis A is slow and symptoms may take weeks to appear. Which of these are symptoms of the illness caused by the Hepatitis A virus?

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Which of these symptom can indicate a guest is having an allergic reaction?

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Which symptoms can indicate that a guest is having an allergic reaction?

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Which of these are symptoms of listeriosis?

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There’s over 160 known allergens, but only eight cause 90% of the allergic reactions. Which of these are Big Eight Allergens?

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Many contaminants are natural and already exist in the plants and animals that we use of food. Which of these is NOT a natural contaminant?

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Which of these dangerous bacteria are NOT Big Six Pathogens?

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Which of these dangerous foodborne bacteria are NOT Big Six Pathogens?

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Which ServSafe guidelines can prevent bacteria from causing foodborne illness?

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Which of these measures can prevent bacteria from causing foodborne illness?

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Which of these are symptoms of Typhoid Fever, the illness caused by the Big Six Pathogen Salmonella Typhi?

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According to the FDA’s food defense program guidelines, which of these are risky practices for deliberate contamination of food?

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Which of these are symptoms of salmonellosis, the illness caused by the Big Six Pathogen Nontyphoidal Salmonella?

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Which of these are neurological symptoms associated with consuming Biological Toxins?

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Which of these are things that you should do when responding to a possible foodborne illness outbreak?

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What are some common symptoms of Typhoid Fever, the illness caused by the Salmonella Typhi bacteria?

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Which statements are true about the parasite cyclosporiasis?

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According to the FDA’s food defense program guidelines what are some risky practices when considering the deliberate contamination of food?

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What are some common symptoms of salmonellosis, the illness caused by the Nontyphoidal Salmonella bacteria?

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What are some common neurological symptoms associated with consuming Biological Toxins?

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Bacteria need moisture to grow. The amount of moisture available in food for bacteria growth is called water activity (aw). Which of these examples of water activity (aw) levels are true?

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FAT TOM is an acronym that represents the conditions that bacteria need in order to grow. What do the letters in FAT TOM represent?

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Kitchen staff must be aware of cross-contact and the ways that it can happen. Which of these are ways to avoid cross-contact when preparing food for a guest with allergies?

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Which of these are ways that cross-contact can be avoided?

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Which of these are ways to prevent the Big Six Pathogen Hepatitis A from making people sick?

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Which of these statements are true about mold?

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Which of these are ways that viruses can be transmitted?

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Bacteria need moisture to grow. The amount of moisture available in food for bacteria growth is called water activity (aw). What are some examples of the water activity (aw)?

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Kitchen staff must be aware of cross-contact and the ways that it can happen. How can allergic reactions be prevented?

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How can cross-contact be avoided?

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What are some ways that Hepatitis A can be prevented?

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Which statement is true about mold?

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Which of these are ways that viruses be transferred?

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Have at least one staff member on every shift that has been trained to take allergen special orders from guests with food allergies. What should this staff member be able to do?

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Which bacteria can be prevented from causing a foodborne illness by controlling time and temperature?

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Which of these are symptoms are possible with illness caused by the Shiga Toxin Producing E. coli bacteria?

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Which statement about Water Activity (aw) is false?

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Which statements are true about allergic reactions?

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Which statement is true about parasites?

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Working with a guest to place an allergen special order a staff member must be able to do the following?

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What is anaphylaxis (anaphylactic shock)?

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Your operation should always have at least one member of staff available who can describe each menu item to a guest upon request. What kind of information should this staff person be prepared to describe?

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What are some ways to protect food and food contact surfaces from contamination by chemicals?

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Some materials can interact with acidic foods (tomatoes, citrus) and create toxic chemicals that can make people sick. What materials should be avoided when choosing kitchenware and equipment for your operation?

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What are some foods commonly associated with parasites?

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What are some examples of foods with a pH that is ideal for bacterial growth?

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Which guideline can prevent cross-contact when preparing an allergen special order?

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Biological toxins cannot be destroyed by freezing or cooking so its best to avoid them by purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers. Which of these seafood toxins does this apply to?

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How does bacteria respond to temperature?

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What chemicals can contaminate food?

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In what kind of food can bacteria grow to unsafe levels if allowed enough time?

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Where do Biological Toxins come from?

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Which large fish can become contaminated with biological toxins after they eat smaller fish that have consumed the toxin?

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Which fish may contain bacteria that produce histamine toxins if the fish is time-temperature abused?

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Which are true about bacteria?

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What is a spore?

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Which parasites can be prevented from causing foodborne illness by purchasing from approved reputable suppliers?

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What are some ways that norovirus is transmitted?

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Which are growth phases for bacteria?

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The letter L in ALERT stands for look. What should a manager look at when considering the deliberate contamination of food?

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The letter E in ALERT stands for employees. What should a manager consider about the employees in the operation regarding the deliberate contamination of food?

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The letter A in ALERT stands for assure. What things should a manager ensure regarding the deliberate contamination of food?

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Sometimes, big fish become contaminated with Ciguatera Toxin after eating smaller fish that have been eating toxic algae. Which fish can become infected this way?

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How can viruses be prevented from causing foodborne illness?

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How can the risk of cross-contact with other food delivered to the table be avoided when delivering an allergen special order to a guest with allergies?

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What are some foods commonly linked with Hepatitis A?

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What is Histamine Toxin?

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What kind of foods are linked with the bacteria clostridium botulinum and its illness botulism?

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Clostridium perfringens bacteria are one of the most common causes of foodborne illness. Which are true about the bacteria?

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If you suspect a food item may have been the source of a foodborne illness, what should you do with it?

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Which statement is true about the illness caused by Shiga Toxin-Producing E. coli bacteria?

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What medical conditions can be caused by aflatoxins produced by some molds?

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Which statement is true about the growth of bacteria?

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The letter T in the ALERT acronym stands for Threat. In a food defense program, how should the manager be prepared for a threat or suspicious activity?

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The letter R in the ALERT acronym stands for Report. What kind of reports should you maintain for your food defense program?

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What is fungi?

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Which statements are true about fungi?

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What do Norovirus and Hepatitis A have in common?

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What should the three points of focus be when developing a food defense program?

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Which is true about viruses?

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Which is a ServSafe guideline for using and storing chemicals?

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What is a sign that a food or beverage is spoiled by yeast?

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What are some foods commonly linked with Shigella spp?

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What are some examples of the kind of conditions in that bacteria do NOT grow well in?

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Which is an examples of fungi?

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Where does bacteria come from?

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Which statements are true about yeast?

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What should a manager do with a food product if they suspect that it could be the source of a foodborne illness outbreak?

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How can listeriosis be prevented?

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How can mold be prevented from spoiling food or causing illness?

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Which statements describe a toxin mediated infection?

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Which is true about where Biological Toxins like Seafood Toxins come from?

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Ciguatera Toxin is a seafood toxin linked to barracuda, snapper, grouper, and amberjack fish. Which of these statement are true about Ciguatera Toxin?

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Which of these is an example of cross-contact?

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Which statements are true about the bacteria clostridium botulinum?

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Which of these measures can prevent the growth of bacteria?

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Which of these measures can prevent injury from physical contamination?

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Which foods have been linked to Shiga Toxin Producing E. coli?

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Norovirus and Hepatitis A are the only two viruses on the FDA’s list of Big Six Pathogens. How can Norovirus be transmitted differently than Hepatitis A?

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Which virus is included in the FDA’s list of Big Six Pathogens?

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Norovirus is responsible for 58% of all reported foodborne illness cases and is the most contagious foodborne pathogen. How is Norovirus transmitted from person to person?

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How is Shigella spp transferred?

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Where does Salmonella Typhi come from?

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Which bacteria is a risk to food in reduced oxygen packaging (ROP)?

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Which are symptoms of rotavirus gastroenteritis?

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These are some common symptoms of illness caused by the Big Six Pathogen Hepatitis A:

• Nausea
• Jaundice
• Vomiting
• Diarrhea
• Fever (mild)
• Poor appetite
• Tea coloured urine
• Abdominal discomfort
• Fatigue or general weakness

What is the onset time for Hepatitis A?

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Which statement is true about the symptoms caused by consuming chemicals?

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What’s the difference between Contact Time and Onset Time?

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Which is a prevention measure for viruses?

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How can physical contamination of food happen?

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Which is true about physical contamination?

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How does physical contamination happen?

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What kinds of foods are parasites commonly associated with?

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How can parasites be prevented from causing foodborne illness?

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Where can the parasite cryptosporidium parvum be found?

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Which is true about partial cooking or par-cooking?

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What should be identified on the label of food packaged on-site for retail sale?

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To avoid cross-contact, what should be done with food packaged on-site for retail sale?

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When should separate fryers and cooking oils be used to fry food?

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To avoid cross-contact, when should you wash your hands and change gloves?

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What can NOT touch the food and beverages for a guest with food allergies or the utensils, equipment, and gloves used to prepare their order?

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What do some operations use a separate set of cooking utensils for?

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When should cookware, utensils, and equipment be washed, rinsed, and sanitized to prevent cross-contact?

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To avoid cross-contact, what should recipes and ingredient labels be checked for?

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What will happen if chocolate chip cookies are put on the same parchment paper used for peanut butter cookies?

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Letting food touch surfaces, equipment, or utensils that have touched allergens is an example of what?

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Why shouldn’t different types of food be cooked in the same fryer oil?

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What is it called when allergens are transferred from food or food-contact surfaces containing an allergen to food served to a guest with allergies?

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What do staff need to avoid transferring from food or food-contact surfaces to the food served to a guest with a food allergy?

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Why should an Allergen Special Order be hand-delivered separately from the other food at the table?

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What should service staff make sure doesn’t touch the plate of a guest with allergies?

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What should service staff do when picking up an Allergen Special Order from the kitchen?

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Why should the order for a guest with allergies be clearly marked by service staff to indicate the identified food allergen?

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What menu items should service staff suggest to a guest with food allergies?

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Are service staff required to tell a guest with allergies what the secret ingredient is in a house specialty?

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Make specific members of your service staff responsible for answering questions about the menu for a guest with food allergies.

• Describe Dishes
• Identify Ingredients
• Suggest Items

How many employees trained for this should be available on each shift?

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Make specific members of your service staff responsible for accommodating a guest with an allergy in these ways:

• Taking an Allergen Special Order
• Identifying the Allergen Special Order
• Avoiding cross-contact
• Delivering food separately

How many employees should be trained and available for this?

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What should service staff be able to tell guests about the menu items?

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When the name of a food product doesn’t include an allergen that it contains, the allergen must be clearly identified on the label. How can this be done?

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What requires manufactured products containing one or more of the big eight allergens to clearly identify them on the ingredient label?

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What is an essential tool that can be used to identify allergens in the products that you purchase?

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What is another food sensitivity that a customer could mention that requires the same precautions as food allergies?

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Who must know how to avoid serving food containing allergens to people with food allergies?

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Of the fifteen million Americans who have a food allergy, how many emergency room visits due to allergic reactions are there every year?

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What is responsible for 90% of all allergic reactions in the United States?

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How many different allergens are responsible for 90% of all allergic reactions in the United States?

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There are more than 160 food allergens, but just eight of them are responsible for 90 percent of all allergic reactions in the United States.

• Soy
• Fish
• Eggs
• Wheat
• Peanuts
• Tree nuts
• Shellfish
• Cow’s milk

What are these eight allergens called?

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How many kinds of food are known to cause allergic reactions?

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What do you need to make sure your staff knows about food allergens?

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What should you do if a customer has a severe allergic reaction to food?

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What is Anaphylaxis?

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These are some common symptoms of an allergic reaction:

• Nausea
• Vomiting
• Diarrhea
• Itchy throat
• Abdominal pain
• Hives or itchy rashes
• Wheezing or shortness of breath
• Swelling of the throat, face, eyes, hands, or feet

How long does it take for the symptoms to begin after the allergen has been eaten?

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What is it called when someone’s immune system considers a harmless protein a threat and attacks it?

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What can happen when a person with allergies consumes the allergen that they are allergic to?

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How do allergens get into food?

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What is it called when someone is sensitive to a harmless protein that occurs naturally in certain foods?

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What tool did the FDA create to help you identify the points where food is at risk for deliberate contamination in your operation?

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Which government agency created the acronym ALERT as a tool for operations to use when developing a food defense program?

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What should a food defense program focus on?

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Deliberate contamination of food is usually focused on targets like these:

• A specific business
• A certain industry
• A processing method
• A specific kind of food

What else is true about deliberate contamination of food?

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In what situation could an attack of deliberate contamination of food occur?

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Food could be contaminated on purpose by an attacker using any of these contaminants:

• Radioactive
• Chemical
• Physical
• Biological

How can a food defense program prevent the deliberate contamination of food?

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What kind of contamination can cause mild to fatal injuries?

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Metal shavings from cans, wood, fingernails, staples, bandages, glass, jewelry, and dirt are examples ServSafe gives for what kind of objects?

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What can happen when natural objects, like bones in a fish fillet, are left in food?

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What could happen if a physical object falls into food?

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How should chemicals be thrown out?

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In what condition should the manufacturer’s label be on chemical containers?

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What is required for equipment and utensils that are used to handle food?

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In what way should chemicals be used by the operation?

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Why should chemicals never be stored above food or food-contact surfaces?

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Why should chemicals stay in original containers with the manufacturer’s label?

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To prevent contamination, chemicals should be stored in their own designated location away from these areas:

• Food prep areas
• Food-storage areas
• Service areas

How can chemicals be kept separate from food and food-contact surfaces during storage?

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What are the requirement for the chemicals you use and store in your operation

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What should you do if you suspect someone has consumed a chemical contaminant?

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What is the onset time for symptoms if someone has consumed a chemical contaminant?

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What kind of contamination is food at risk for when using kitchenware or equipment made from pewter, copper, zinc, or painted pottery?

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How can kitchenware and equipment made from these materials leach toxic metals into food and cause chemical contamination?

• Zinc
• Pewter
• Copper
• Painted pottery

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What can be caused by deodorizers, first-aid products, and health and beauty products, like hand lotions and hairsprays?

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Cleaners, sanitizers, polishes, machine lubricants, and pesticides are examples of what kind of contaminant?

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What can contaminate food when used or stored incorrectly?

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What is a critical way to prevent foodborne illness from biological toxins?

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What biological contaminant cannot be destroyed by cooking or freezing?

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A person with a foodborne illness caused by seafood toxins may experience any of these symptoms:

• Hives
• Diarrhea
• Vomiting
• Heart palpitations
• Difficulty breathing
• Flushing of the face
• Burning in the mouth
• Neurological symptoms

When does a person begin experiencing symptoms (onset-time) after consuming a seafood toxin?

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What neurological symptom may be experienced by someone with a foodborne illness caused by seafood toxins?

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When can shellfish become contaminated with biological toxins?

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Which seafood toxin can fish become contaminated with by eating smaller fish that have eaten the toxin?

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Fish do NOT produce Histamine, but these fish could be contaminated with pathogens that do:

• Tuna
• Bonito
• Mackerel
• Mahi Mahi

If a fish is contaminated with pathogens that produce Histamine, when will they produce it?

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Which seafood toxin is produced by pathogens in the fish during time-temperature abuse?

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What kind of biological contaminant is a natural poison produced by some plants, mushrooms, and seafood?

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The onset-time is how long it takes for the symptoms of an illness to begin. Many people start experiencing these symptoms within minutes of consuming seafood toxins:

• Vomiting
• Diarrhea
• Flushing of the face
• Difficulty breathing
• Burning in the mouth
• Heart palpitations
• Hives
• Neurological symptoms

What neurological symptoms may occur after eating fish contaminated with seafood toxins?

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What form of biological contamination causes the most foodborne illnesses?

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Why do mushrooms need to be purchased from approved, reputable suppliers?

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What should be done with moldy food unless the mold is a natural part of the food?

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What do some fungi (mold, mushrooms) naturally produce that can cause foodborne illness?

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Which is an example of fungi?

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How can an operation prevent parasites from causing foodborne illness when serving raw or undercooked fish?

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Parasites can get into fruits and vegetables irrigated or washed with contaminated water. What other kind of food is at risk for parasites?

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How can you prevent parasites from causing foodborne illnesses?

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Parasites are often linked with these foods:

• Seafood
• Wild game
• Contaminated Produce

How can produce (fruits, vegetables) get contaminated with parasites?

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What pathogen requires a host to live and reproduce?

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Why should spoiled food be thrown out quickly?

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Molds can grow in food that other pathogens can NOT grow in. Which is an example of this?

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First, notify your local regulatory authority if your operation has been involved in a foodborne illness outbreak. If any of the suspected products remain, how should they be segregated until they are collected by investigators for testing?

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When “Identifying Staff” in response to a foodborne illness outbreak, what should you do with the staff who were scheduled at the time of the incident?

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When responding to a foodborne illness outbreak, what is the proper procedure for segregating the product (if any remains)?