Lesson 3

108

Module Three, ServSafe Manager Practice Test

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Who should determine when the employees can safely return to the operation and/or carry out their regular food-handling duties?

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Why should you cooperate with medical staff and your regulatory authority when making a decision to excluded or restrict a food handler?

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What should you do when a food handler does NOT have symptoms, but has been dignosed with Hepatitis A or Salmonella Typhi?

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No Question

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When can a food handler who has been excluded for jaundice return to work?

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What should you do if a food handler has any of these issues?
• A sore throat with a fever
• Constant sneezing, coughing, or runny nose
• An infected cut or burn that is not covered

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What should you do if a food handler has any of these issues?
• Is sick and vomiting
• Is sick and has diarrhea
• Is diagnosed with Hepatitis A
• Becomes jaundiced within a week
• Is diagnosed with Salmonella Typhi
• Has a fever with a sore throat and you serve a high-risk population

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When can a food handler who has been excluded for vomiting or diarrhea return to work?

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Jaundice is a yellowing of the skin, eyes, or fingernails and is a symptom of the foodborne illness Hepatitis A. If a food handler suddenly (within a week) appears jaundiced, exclude them from the operation. What other symptoms require you to exclude a food handler?

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What should you do if a food handler is coughing, sneezing or has a runny nose?

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If you serve a high-risk population and exclude a food handler for having a sore throat with a fever, when can they return to work?

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What should you do when a food handler has a sore throat with a fever, and you primarily serve a high-risk population?

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What should you do when a food handler has both a sore throat and a fever?

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What should you do when a food handler has a cut or burn that has become infected?

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Why should you be aware of these conditions in your staff?
• Fever
• Vomiting
• Diarehha
• Sneezing
• Runny nose
• Chills/cold sweats
• Frequent bathroom use
• Yellowing of the skin or eyes

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You must report to your regulatory authority when a food handler is diagnosed with what kind of illness?

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Staff must report it to you if they are sickened by one of the Big Six Pathogens. And you must report it to your regulatory authority.
• Norovirus
• Hepatitis A
• Shigella spp.
• Salmonella Typhi
• Nontyphoidal Salmonella
• Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC)
Which Big Six Pathogens also require that your staff report to you if someone they live with has been sickened?

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What do you need to do if a food handler is diagnosed with an illness caused by one of these pathogens?
• Norovirus
• Hepatitis A
• Shigella spp.
• Salmonella Typhi
• Nontyphoidal Salmonella
• Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC)

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What must a food handler do if they are diagnosed with an illness caused by one of these pathogens?
• Norovirus
• Hepatitis A
• Shigella spp.
• Salmonella Typhi
• Nontyphoidal Salmonella
• Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC)

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What are the Big Six Pathogens?

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What might you need to do if a food handler has any of these symptoms?
• Vomiting
• Diarrhea
• Jaundice
• Sore throat with fever
• Infected wound or boil

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What is it called when you prohibit an employee from coming into the operation for a medical reason?

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What is it called when you prohibit an employee from working with exposed food, utensils, and equipment for a medical reason?

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What should staff do if they get sick while working?

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When do staff need to report illnesses to you?

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How can you prove to your regulatory authority that you have instructed your staff to report to you when they are sick?

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Your staff needs know that they must report to you when they are sick. Does this include staff who have just been hired and have not started working yet?

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When are servers allowed to wear jewelry?

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Why do staff need to remove jewelry from their hands and arms before prepping food or when working around prep areas?

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What are some examples of the type of jewelry that your company may not allow staff to wear?

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No Question

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When do food handlers need to remove these types of jewelry?
• Watches
• Earrings
• Necklaces
• Facial jewelry • Rings (except for a plain band)
• Bracelets (including medical bracelets)

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When is it acceptable to wipe your hands on your apron?

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What do food handlers need to do with their aprons at these times?
• Before using the restroom • Before taking out the trash
• Before leaving food prep areas

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When dirty clothing is stored in the operation (aprons, chef coats, uniforms) how can it be kept away from food and prep areas?

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When dirty clothing is stored in the operation, what does it need to be kept away from?

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Where should street clothing and personal belongings such as backpacks, jackets, electronic devices, keys, and personal medications be stored?

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When it’s possible, where is the best place for staff to change into their work clothes?

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Why do staff need to wear clean clothing every day and change their uniforms and aprons when they become soiled?

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What do food handlers with facial hair need to wear?

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Why are staff not allowed to wear false eyelashes?

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What are the only kind of hair accessories that staff should be allowed to wear?

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Staff should only be allowed to wear hair accessories that are designed to keep hair out of food and to help staff avoid touching their hair. Why shouldn’t you allow other kinds of hair accessories?

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Why do staff need to wear a clean hat or other hair restraints in food-prep areas?

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No Question

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Staff beverage containers must be covered with a lid to prevent contamination of these:
• Their hands
• The beverage container
• Food, utensils, and equipment
What does the lid need to include?

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Don’t allow your staff to eat, drink, chew gum or use tobacco while prepping or serving food. What areas of the operation should these activities be banned?

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Where should employees eat, drink, smoke, and chew gum or tobacco?

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What can be transferred to the hands or to food when eating, drinking, smoking, or chewing gum or tobacco?

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What can small droplets of saliva contain that could cause a foodborne illnesses?

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A dress code should be set up in your operation to prevent pathogens from being transferred from clothing to food. How can you make sure the dress code works?

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Dirty clothing may carry pathogens that can cause foodborne illnesses. How can these pathogens be transferred from the clothing to the food being prepared?

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What can dirty clothing carry that could cause a foodborne illnesses?

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If your jurisdiction allows bare-hand contact with ready-to-eat food, what kind of training does your staff need?

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If your jurisdiction allows bare-hand contact with ready-to-eat food, what kind of policies does your operation need to have in place?

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When is it acceptable to handle ready-to-eat food with bare hands?

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If you primarily serve a high-risk population, when is it acceptable to handle ready-to-eat food with bare hands?

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What do food handlers need to do at these times?
• Every four hours
• After a break from a task
• Before handling ready-to-eat food
• When they have a tear or get dirty
• Before you start doing something else
• After handling raw meat, seafood, or poultry

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After putting on gloves, what should you check them for?

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To avoid touching the glove as much as possible, how should you hold a glove when putting it on?

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Why is it important to wear the correct glove size?

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As long as your hands have not become contaminated, when is it acceptable to change gloves without rewashing your hands?

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Why should you consider providing gloves that are not made from latex?

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What should have these features?
• Food safe
• Single-use
• Various sizes
• Latex alternatives

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What kind of ready-to-eat food can be handled with bare hands?

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What must NOT be used as a replacement for handwashing?

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When used properly, how can single-use gloves help to keep food safe?

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What should be done with single-use gloves after a task?

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When a wound or boil is located on the body (NOT hands or arms), what kind of bandage should it be covered with?

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How should a wound or boil on the arm be covered?

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How should a wound or boil on the hand or wrist be covered?

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Why is it important where an infected cut or burn is located?

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Why must Infected cuts and burns be covered if they are open or draining?

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Why are food handlers only allowed to wear nail polish if they are wearing single-use gloves?

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Why are food handlers only allowed to wear false fingernails if they are wearing single-use gloves?

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What are food handlers allowed to wear only when they are also wearing single-use gloves?

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Why should food handlers keep their fingernails clean?

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Why should food handlers keep their fingernails trimmed and filed?

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What will happen if a food handlers fingernail chips or breaks off into food?

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Why should food handlers keep their fingernails short?

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After using a hand antiseptic what must happen before you touch food or equipment?

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When is it acceptble to use hand antiseptics in place of hand washing?

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What should be done before using hand antiseptics?

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What standards do hand sanitizers and antiseptics need to comply with if they are used in a food service operation?

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What are hand antiseptics, also called hand sanitizers, used to lower the number of on the skin?

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What are the liquids and gels called that some people use to kill pathogens on their hands or skin?

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What may be necessary when food handlers are not following proper handwashing procedures?

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What should you do if food or food-contact surfaces may have been contaminated after being touched by unwashed hands?

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What should you do when you see a food handler who is not following proper handwashing procedures?

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What do food handlers need to do after these activities?
• Handling money
• Handling animals
• Completing a task
• Using the bathroom
• Taking out the trash
• Handling hazardous chemicals
• Touching their clothes or body
• Using a handkerchief or tissue
• Handling anything that is dirty
• Using a phone or personal device
• Handling raw meat, seafood, or poultry
• Leaving and returning to their work area
• Coughing, sneezing, or blowing their nose
• Touching dirty equipment or surfaces
• Eating, drinking, smoking, or chewing gum or tobacco

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What must food handlers do before before putting on single-use gloves?

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What must food handlers do before preparing food or working with clean equipment and utensils?

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How can a paper towel be used to avoid contaminating your hands after washing them in the restroom?

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How many seconds should be spent vigorously scrubing hands and arms during handwashing?

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How long should the whole handwashing process take?

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Are the steps the same for washing hands as they are for washing a prosthetic device?

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What are the steps to correct hand washing?

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What should never be done in a sink designated for food prep or dishwashing or sinks used for discarding waste water?

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How can you make sure that food handlers are washing their hands in the correct sink?

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Where should food handlers wash their hands?

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What should you do after training food handlers to wash their hands?

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Can healthy people spread pathogens?

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What do our hands touch every day that we cannot see?

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Do most food handlers wash their hands correctly or as often as they should?

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Wht is the most important part of personal hygiene?

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What is proper handwashing and hand care critical in preventing?

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No Question

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These actions by a manager will ensure that a personal hygeine program is successful.
• Make personal hygiene policies
• Train staff to follow your policies and retrain them regularly
• Be a good role model by always demonstrating the correct behavior
• Always supervise any activities that can affect food safety
• Keep your personal hygiene policies current with science and the law
As the manager, what role do you play in your operations personal hygeine program?

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No Question

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What program does your operation need to keep food handlers from contaminating food?

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Why should these actions be avoided?
• Scratching the scalp
• Running fingers through the hair
• Wiping or touching the nose
• Rubbing an ear
• Touching a pimple or an infected wound/boil
• Wearing and touching a dirty uniform
• Coughing or sneezing into the hand
• Spitting in the operation

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What is a person called who carries pathogens and infects others but never gets sick themself?

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What is the fecal-oral route of contamination?

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What could happen when a food handler in your operation has any of these issues?
• They’re sneezing or coughing
• They have a foodborne illness
• They have an infected cut or burn
• They have been in contact with a sick person
• They don’t wash their hands after using the bathroom
• They have an infectous symptom like diarrhea, vomiting, or jaundice

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Can a food handler who appears to be healthy spread foodborne pathogens?

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Your staff need to know that they must report to you when they are sick. What food safety program is reporting illnesses a part of?