Lesson 6

43

Module Six, ServSafe Manager Practice Test

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What cooking process do these steps describe?
1. Cook the food for less than 60 minutes
2. Immediately cool the food
3. Store the food frozen or refrigerated
4. Cook the food to its required minimum internal temperature
5. Serve the food immediately, put it in hot holding, or cool and store the food

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The smaller containers of food in the ice-water bath will cool faster and more evenly if stirred often. What kind of paddle can be used to cool the food super fast?

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What equipment can quickly cool a large amount of food by blasting it with cold air?

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Food can be cooled quickly in a clean, sanitized prep sink filled with ice water. In addition to separating it into smaller containers, how can you make the food cool faster and more evenly?

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Why shouldn’t coolers and refrigerators be used to cool large amounts of hot food unless they were built for that purpose?

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How does the storage container affect how quickly food will cool?

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No Question

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To cool a large amount of food with an ice-water bath, spread the food out using shallow pans.

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How does the food’s size affect how quickly it will cool?

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How does the thickness or density of the food affect how quickly it will cool?

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After cooking, how much time do you have to cool TCS food from 135°F to 41°F or lower?

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When cooling food in two stages, what should be done next if the temperature requirements for the first stage are met before the two-hour time limit is up?

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When cooling food in two stages, what should be done if the temperature requirements for the first stage are not met within two hours?

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Pathogens grow between 41°F and 135°F. But they grow the fastest between 70°F and 125°F. When cooling food in two stages, which stage has the most potential for pathogen growth?

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Newly cooked TCS food must be cooled from 135°F to 41°F or lower within six hours. The safest way to do this is in two stages. How long should the stages last?

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Why must TCS food be cooled to 41°F or lower within six hours of cooking?

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If food is not immediately served or put in hot holding after being cooked, how should you get it out of the temperature danger zone?

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What should be done as soon as possible once food has been cooked?

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What is important about this list of TCS foods?
• Unpasteurized eggs
• Unpasteurized milk or juice
• Raw seed sprouts
• Raw or undercooked meat, seafood, or poultry

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Why is it important that raw or undercooked ground beef is not offered on a children’s menu?

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According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), what menu should not offer raw or undercooked meat, poultry, seafood, or eggs?

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Guests must be reminded that eating raw or undercooked food increases their chance of getting a foodborne illness. This is called a reminder. They are often put on the places listed here.
• The menu
• Brochures
• Table-tents
• Signs
What is the reccomended way of putting it on the menu?

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What should customers be advised about when they order a TCS food item that is served raw or undercooked?

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What is the difference between a disclosure and a reminder?

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The disclosure can be put at the bottom of the menu in a footnote, if each raw or undercooked menu item has an asterisk giving attention to it. What’s another way to note a disclosure on your menu?

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No Question

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What must a menu include if it offers raw or undercooked TCS food items?

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When is it acceptable to serve TCS food not cooked to its required minimum internal temperature?

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No Question

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Operations that par-cook food need written procedures describing how the food will be prepped and stored. What should these procedures explain about storing the food?

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No Question

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Specific requirements must be met at each step to par cooking food. What should the written procedures explain about these requirements to get approved by the local regulatory authority?

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Once the final cooking is complete, how should par-cooked food be handled if it is not immediately served or held for service?

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What must be done with par-cooked food before it can be served or sold?

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No Question

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After its initial cooking, par-cooked food should be cooled and then frozen or refrigerated. How should the food be stored if it is refrigerated at this step?

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When par cooking food, what should be done with the food immediately after the initial cooking?

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When par cooking food, what is the maximum amount of time that the food can be cooked during initial cooking?

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Operations must have written procedures approved by their local regulatory authority if they will be par cooking food. What do these procedures need to explain?

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What does an operation need to have before it can par-cook food?

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What is it called when an operation begins cooking food during prep and then finishes it just before service?

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Why does the temperature of the food need to be checked in at least two places when cooking in a microwave?

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Why should you leave the food covered and let it stand for at least two minutes after cooking in a microwave?

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Why should the food be rotated or stirred halfway through the cooking process when using a microwave?

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Why should food be covered when cooking in a microwave?

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When cooked in a microwave, what is the required minimum internal temperature for TCS food (meat, seafood, poultry, eggs)?

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What should be done after checking the temperature in the thickest part of the food and recording the measurement?

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Where should the thermometer probe be inserted to check the temperature of food?

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How should you determine which thermometer to use when checking food temperatures?

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If cooking reduces the pathogens in food to a safe level, why do we still need to avoid time-temperature abuse before cooking it?

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To reduce the pathogens in food to a safe level, each type of food must be cooked to a different minimum internal temperature for a specific amount of time. What should be done if a customer asks for their food to be cooked to a lower temperature?

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Whats next, once the minimum internal temperature is reached during cooking?

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What is the only way to reduce pathogens in food to safe levels?

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What is required before an operation can handle or prep food with any of the methods listed below?
• Packaging fresh juice on-site for sale at a later time
• Smoking food as a way to preserve it
• Preserve or alter the food so that it no longer needs time and temperature control for safety
• Curing food
• Custom-processing animals for personal use
• Packaging food using a reduced-oxygen packaging (ROP) method
• Sprouting seeds or beans
• Offering live shellfish from a display tank

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When does smoking food require a variance?

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When can you package fresh juice on-site for retail sale without a variance?

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When could your regulatory authority require you to submit a HACCP plan?

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What document can your regulatory authority issue that will allow a regulatory requirement to be waived or changed?

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What containers should never be used to scoop, store, or carry ice?

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What should NOT be used to transfer ice from the ice machine?

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Where should ice scoops be stored?

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What should be used to transfer ice from an ice machine to other containers?

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Sometimes ice can be added as an ingredient to cool hot food quickly. What kind of ice should NOT be used for this purpose?

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What kind of water should be used for making ice?

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Before using previously cooked TCS food (leftovers) as an ingredient in salads, what should its use-by date be checked for?

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When can leftover TCS food (pasta, chicken, potatoes) be used as an ingredient for salads?

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Why do salads containing these TCS ingredients need to be handled with special care?
• Eggs
• Tuna • Pasta • Chicken
• Potatoes

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Why do salads containing TCS ingredients have a righer risk for foodborne-illness?

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When is it acceptable to use un-pasteurized shell eggs in a dish served to a high-risk population, such as those in a hospital or a nursing home?

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What situation requires using pasteurized shell eggs for pooling?

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If your operation primarily serves high-risk populations, when must eggs or egg products be pasteurized?

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What kind of eggs or egg products should you consider using when prepping a dish that requires little or no cooking?

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When pooling eggs, what must be done between batches?

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When pooling eggs, what should be done soon after mixing them?

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What are eggs called when cracked open and combined in a container?

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When can an operation handle pooled eggs?

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What kind of produce should not be offered if your operation primarily serves high-risk populations?

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What must be done with produce (melons, tomatoes, leafy greens) once it has been cut or sliced?

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When is it acceptable to mix different kinds of produce or different batches of the same produce?

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What should be avoided when prepping or storing produce?

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To control pathogens, what is sometimes used to wash or treat produce?

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What chemicals are sometimes used to treat produce?

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How should leafy greens such as lettuce and spinach be washed

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What kind of produce needs special attention when it’s being washed?

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What must be done with produce before it can be cut, cooked, or combined with other ingredients?

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What will happen if produce touches a surface after raw meat, seafood, or poultry touched the same surface?

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How must salads containing TCS ingredients, eggs, produce, and ice be handled and prepared?

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When can frozen fish in reduced-oxygen packaging (ROP) be removed from its packaging?

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When handling or preparing frozen fish in reduced-oxygen packaging (ROP), what should be noted on its label?

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Frozen fish in reduced-oxygen packaging (ROP) should usually be frozen until when?

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Remove frozen ROP fish from its package before thawing it in a cooler. When thawing ROP fish under running water, when can it be removed from its package?

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What should be done with food as soon after it has thawed in microwave?

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When thawing frozen food, never let any part of the food go above 41°F for more than four hours. In addition to the time it thaws, what other time is counted towards this four-hour limit?

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Why do the foods on this list require special care during handling and preparation?
• Ice
• Eggs
• Produce
• Salads containing TCS ingredients

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Frozen food can be thawed under running water in a clean and sanitized food-prep sink. What is required for the water when thawing food this way?

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What temperature must a cooler be kept at when it is used to thaw frozen food?

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Why is it unsafe to thaw food at room temperature?

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While frozen food is being thawed, what will happen if any part of the food is exposed to the temperature danger zone?

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When the temperature of hot food falls into the temperature danger zone, sometimes it can be restored to a safe condition by reheating it. This is called “reconditioning.” But when the food has been at an unsafe temperature for too long, reconditioning will not work. How much time can food spend in the temperature danger zone and still be reconditioned?

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What is it called when food is restored to a safe condition, usually by reheating it?

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What should be done if food has exceeded the time and temperature requirements that keep it safe?

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Food contaminated by bare hands or bodily fluids must be thrown out. What should be done with food handled by a staff member who was excluded for illness?

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What happens if produce touches a surface that raw meat, seafood, or poultry touched first?

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What should you do with food that is not presented in an honest way?

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How does food need to be presented to guests?

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No Question

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Besides food additives and color additives, what else should NOT be used to misrepresent the appearance of food?

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Why should food be presented in a way that does not mislead or misinform customers?

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What kind of produce should NOT be treated with sulfites?

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No Question

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What rule must be followed when using color additives or other food additives?

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Once food has been prepped, what should be done with it soon after?

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Why is it important to limit the amount of food taken from the cooler at once?

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How much food should be taken from the cooler for preparation at one time?

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How can you prevent pathogens from growing and spreading in your operation?

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What is food at risk for during preparation?